The 8-inch 4k super-high resolution LCD display
The 8-inch 4k super-high resolution LCD display
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The automotive display for cockpits
The automotive display for cockpits
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Japan Display Inc developed an 8-inch 4k super-high resolution LCD display and a next-generation automotive display and will exhibit them at Display Innovation 2014, which runs from Oct 29 to 31, 2014, in Yokohama City, Japan.

The 8-inch 4k LCD display was developed under the concept of "a display for holding vivid video in one hand." To realize low power consumption, slimness, light weight and narrow bezel, which are required for mobile devices, Japan Display made improvements to its "IPS-NEO" IPS LCD technology and "WhiteMagic" technology, which adds white (W) subpixels to RGB (red, green and blue) colors.

Japan Display expanded the color gamut of the IPS-NEO technology to 95% on NTSC standards. Also, it further reduced the power consumption of the WhiteMagic technology by using the "backlight dimming" technology, which partially dims backlight in accordance with video to be displayed.

Furthermore, Japan Display improved the touch input function so that it can be operated not only with a finger but also with a pen whose tip is only 1mm in diameter. This was realized by improving the sensitivity of the company's "Pixel Eyes" in-cell touch panel technology. For the TFT, a low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS), which contributes to the improvement in resolution, was employed.

The next-generation automotive display is for cockpits installed in front of the driver's seat. It is equipped with a curved rectangular display that shows various information useful for driving and a high-resolution head-up display (HUD) that projects navigation and warning information onto the windshield. The curved rectangular display uses the IPS-NEO and WhiteMagic technologies.

Japan Display will also exhibit an ultralow power-consumption reflective display and a sheet-like OLED display at Display Innovation 2014.