Terumo and Okano Industrial's "Nanopass33" needle
Terumo and Okano Industrial's "Nanopass33" needle
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"Miura-Ori" map folding invented by Koryo Miura. It is also deployed for solar panel arrays on satellites.
"Miura-Ori" map folding invented by Koryo Miura. It is also deployed for solar panel arrays on satellites.
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"geo System" uses geothermal energy for ventilation. The system can also be used at plants.
"geo System" uses geothermal energy for ventilation. The system can also be used at plants.
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On October 30, 2006, the "Japanesque Modern" Committee announced the winners of its first "Japanesque Modern" 100 Awards. Japanesque Modern was set up to select products and systems, which fuse Japanese traditional cultures, materials, techniques and spirits with cutting-edge technologies. The initiative is aimed at boosting Japan's international competitiveness. The Award's first winners include the "Nanopass33" needle for insulin injection by Terumo Corp. and Okano Industrial Corp. (headquarters in Tokyo), "ASIMO" robot by Honda Motor Co., Ltd., "AQUOS" LCD television system by Sharp Corp. and "VIERA" plasma television system by Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. The committee selected 53 winners from a total of 254 entries and granted the "J-Mark" certification to them.

The Japaneseque Modern Committee was formed in January 2006 in response to proposals in a report submitted by Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry's "Brand Promotion Council for Japanesque Modern." Chaired by Kunio Nakamura, CEO of Matsushita, the committee's corporate members include Canon Inc., Toyota Motor Corp. and Matsushita Electric Industrial, with the Ministries of Foreign Affairs of Japan, Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Land Infrastructure and Transport (MLIT) and Agency for Cultural Affairs participating from the Japanese government as observers. The committee's council members led by Shinji Fukukawa, Chairman of the Machine Industry Memorial Foundation, conducted the screening.

Among other conditions, entry items had to be made in Japan, by Japanese companies and can be purchased and experienced by the general public as of October 30, 2006. Any products, contents, services and systems were eligible, regardless of genre. After reviewing application materials of entries submitted by member companies or recommended by the council members, the council examined actual items and selected award winners. The council saw if the product or content's concept or design shows "craftsmanship," "hospitality" and "manners," and if the item represents Japanese uniqueness, among other criteria. Yutaka Hikosaka, a council member and architect, said, "We focused on the item's philosophy, sense and other attitudes toward manufacturing," and added, "This Award's difference between the Good Design Prize is that we even selected items with immature representation."

The committee aims to spread the concept of Japanesque Modern both inside and outside of Japan from now. Awarded items will be presented at Nihonbashi Mitsui Tower from October 31 to November 11, TEPIA Plaza (the Machine Industry Memorial Foundation) from October 31 to November 5 and Panasonic Center Tokyo from October 31 to November 26, and the committee also plans to hold a promotional exhibition in Paris, France in 2007.